Why It’s So Hard to Find a Cure for Cancer

One reason why it is hard to find a cure for cancer because it only takes one mutated, malfunctioning cell out of an estimated 37.2 trillion cells.

Sometimes, all it takes is one breakthrough—one miraculous moment in a research lab or patient ward—to make a huge difference in the lives of millions. Look at Dr. Salk and his polio vaccine or Dr. Barnard with his first human heart transplant. Yes, those moments were preceded by years of research, investigation, failure, and frustration, but once they occurred, medicine never looked back.

Cancer forms at the basic, cellular level. All it takes is one malfunctioning, mutated cell.
Cancer forms at the basic, cellular level. All it takes is one malfunctioning, mutated cell.

Millions of lives were spared the pain and suffering of polio, and three to five thousand lives a year are saved through heart transplants, not to mention all the friends and loved ones of those few thousand who are affected by their new leases on life.

When it comes to cancer, however, there have been few of those medical miracles, few breakthroughs leading to a definitive, life-altering cure. It’s not business mismanagement, lack of research, lack of funding, or lack of concern. It has a lot more to do with human biology than anything else. It is much different than electronics or websites. Let’s look at some of the facts and obstacles that are hindering cancer cures.

Continue reading “Why It’s So Hard to Find a Cure for Cancer”